Anatomy of a Deportation

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Nothing ranks as high on an expat’s list of fears as being deported. Maybe death of a loved one while you’re abroad. Not your own death, because like the average teenager, you think your charmed expat life is immortal. Those who have lived overseas know all too well both death and deportation are likely scenarios. Neither is polite to discuss in public.

I wrote about both in The Dohmestics, my most recent paperback release, based on observations as an expat for nearly a decade. The novel explores the lives of six women: three employers and three housemaids who live in the same compound, or walled neighborhood. I found out how difficult the employer-housemaid relationship was to describe in the process of trying to get interviews as background research. Even friends were reluctant to let me speak to their helpers.

Then fact and fiction collided when we were told that a nanny in the neighborhood’s sister was in the detention facility.

That’s how we learned there’s something worse than being deported. Detention.

The sister, also a nanny had runaway from her employer who had her working at several homes in the extended family with little sleep or food. Yes, for some reason, we use the word “runaway” to describe a grown woman who has no other recourse to end her employment. Runaway: a word that has been to describe willful teenagers and slaves, those beings treated as human chattel.

She left her employer one day, walking out while the family was upstairs. She worked for a series of other families in various conditions: sometimes sleeping on the floor on the kitchen because the maid’s room was used a storage. Waking up at 4:30 a.m. to iron and cook for her landlord who also charged her rent. Bouncing from family to family, a few years went by. An ailing mother, a maturing daughter: she wanted to go home.

She got an airline ticket – hard to come by at the tune of thousands of riyals – and went with her luggage to the embassy. They turned her over  to CID or the criminal investigation department. She called, hysterical, because she was being held in a facility with hundreds of other women, some of whom had been there for a month, others for three.

The line was scratchy: they were default fasting because no one was being given food during Ramadan.

Despite being a women’s area, there were no sanitary supplies.

Anything you received, you had to get from someone on the outside.

We assembled a care package, the contents what you might take your daughter’s dorm room: peanut butter, bread, jam, Kotex, chocolate, laundry detergent.

More calls, from random numbers, from borrowed phones (hers had been confiscated) of other long timers. Rushed conversations to exchange file numbers and any updates.

She has a good chance of eventually going home. She has a ticket, no debt, no pending charges. Someone has to take interest in her to distinguish her case from the hundreds of others who are much, much worse. They are waiting on sponsors to pay fines for having a runaway (that word again), waiting for family to raise money to bring them home, waiting for a miracle to clear their debts.

“That’s the place people take their maids when they want to punish them,” a friend told me. “If they don’t want them any more, they leave them there.”

As you may recall, my first book was banned for being about Qatar and Qataris. I had no idea that love was a sensitive subject.

Maids, though, housemaids, I knew were controversial. They are the invisible army without the glamour (or indignation) of the 2022 World Cup stadiums to galvanize the international media to their cause. There is no country named in The Dohmestics because I hope it makes it into the hands of readers in Doha. But also because the treatment of these women, who sacrifice their lives for their children, fund unfaithful husbands, and prop up their home economies (personal and national), is commonly archaic across the Middle East – whether Lebanon, the GCC, or Egypt – and extends into Asia where high rise suicide jumpers in Singapore are so commonplace, they only make the news if they take a young child with them.

“I am not a housemaid,” I said enunciating the vowels for the embassy official who had missed my American dress, accent and husband. “I am here for a friend.”

Is the deportation facility in the novel? You’ll have to read it to find out. This is one instance when real life is worse than fiction.

 

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Reader Comments

  1. Reese Ryan

    Excellent post, Mohana. It is quite sad that adult women who choose to leave the poor treatment of their employers are considered “runaways.” I wonder if the situation would be as deplorable if these “runaways” were men. Either way, thank you for revealing the truth of this sitatution that many find it easier to ignore. I look forward to reading The Dohmestics

    • Mohana

      Thanks for reading Reese. Yes it’s shocking how infantilized adults can be because of their race or profession. Even the male construction workers have few rights: you see them being transported in school buses from one part of the city to the next. How ironic!

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